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Machine Gun Kelly Reveals Tupac Song Made Him Emotional

Machine Gun Kelly revealed the last song that made him cry was one by Hip Hop icon Tupac Shakur.

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In the September issue of Entertainment Weekly, Machine Gun Kelly spoke about his younger days growing up. Born Colson Baker in Houston, Texas, his early life experience lead him down a path of pain. After moving to Denver, Colorado with his father, severing ties with his mother, MGK witnessed his father battle depression. In addition, MGK was the victim of bullying from neighbourhood kids.

After graduating high school, MGK was kicked out of their home by his father. Around this time he experimented with drugs and as a result of going through so much at a young age, MGK found Hip Hop. Not only did he fall in love with the genre, but he also found comfort in the lyrics. Particularly, one song touched him deep inside, “Pain” by Tupac Shakur.

Machine Gun Kelly Reveals Tupac Song Made Him Emotional
Tupac (Chi Modu)

Speaking with Entertainment Weekly, Machine Gun Kelly explains how the song resonated with him. “When I used to run away from home I slept at a train station, and “Pain” by Tupac, this bonus track off the Above The Rim soundtrack, gave me so much comfort,” MGK said. “I definitely cried my eyes out to it. It’s just a beautiful song, and the lyrics, they hit really hard.”

Sampling “Living Inside Your Love” by Earl Klugh, “Pain” featuring Stretch appears as a bonus track from the Above The Rim movie soundtrack, which went double platinum in the US. Despite playing one of the main roles in the 1994 movie (Birdie), Tupac only appears once on the soundtrack. Viewers can hear “Pain” in the climactic scene of the movie. This is the scene when Bugaloo, played by Marlon Wayans, ran up on Birdie and murdered him.

Machine Gun Kelly isn’t the only person to connect with the song. In 2016, to honor their fallen loved ones, the Outlawz made a tribute song titled “So Much Pain”. Most noteworthy, Hussein Fatal came up with the idea. It became one of the last songs he worked on before his tragic death. “It’s a powerful record,” Young Noble said. “We don’t like to re-do Tupac songs, but I think we did this one justice and did it in a different way.

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